5 Ways to Combine Traditional and Digital Marketing | Business

As more companies turn to digital marketing, traditional marketing channels have become cheaper and more accessible to businesses of all sizes. Try out these five tactics to combine traditional strategies with digital marketing to increase your reach and appeal to consumers.

Now more than ever, consumers research products and services online before purchasing. Even in brick-and-mortar stores, 82 percent of smartphone users look up reviews or information about the product they are about to buy. So it makes sense that 99 percent of businesses plan to increase their digital marketing investment next year. Marketing messages must be online to reach those customers who actively seek information in digital spaces.

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Choosing the Right Startup Team | The Startup Magazine

Every journey needs a map. Before you begin to build your team, it’s important to identify some key principles that will inform and guide your search. Entrepreneur Magazine notes a few:

Commit to all parties being on the same page.

From small projects to the general company mission, it’s important to ensure that everyone involved is ultimately working toward the same goal. Whether fixing a small issue or tackling a company-wide challenge, every person must understand the direction the company is headed and the plan for getting there. Make sure you know this from the beginning and carry it out by example.

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Theresa May survives confidence vote of Tory MPs | BBC News

Prime Minister Theresa May has won a vote of confidence in her leadership of the Conservative Party by 200 to 117.

After securing 63% of the total vote, she is now immune from a leadership challenge for a year.

Speaking in Downing Street, she vowed to deliver the Brexit “people voted for” but said she had listened to the concerns of MPs who voted against her.

Her supporters urged the party to move on but critics said losing the support of a third of MPs was “devastating”.

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Why The Biggest Threat to Silicon Valley Could Be Inside Your Gadgets | Inc.com

Certain intervals of time we accept as givens. The earth rotates on its axis once every 24 hours; seven days make a week; a half-hour sitcom is really 22 minutes plus commercials; Apple does a big-deal iPhone launch every other year. You know: the fundamentals.

In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore identified one of these intervals in a way we still associate with his name. Thanks to miniaturization, he observed, the number of tran­sistors that could fit onto a single microchip was doubling every year, making computers exponentially more powerful, energy-efficient, and inexpensive. In 1975, he revised Moore’s law, as it was by then known, to set the period of doubling at 24 months, where it has remained ever since.

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Congress Blew Its Hearing With Google CEO Sundar Pichai | WIRED

ON TUESDAY, THE House Judiciary Committee had the opportunity to question one of the most powerful people on the planet—Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google, the company that filters all the world’s information. And they blew it.

Over the course of three and a half hours, the members of the committee staked out opposite sides of a partisan battle over whether Google search and other products are biased against conservatives. Republican members largely criticized the company for burying conservative websites in search results and amplifying criticism of conservative policies—accusations that Google has repeatedly denied. Democrats only poured fuel on the fire by spending their allotted five minutes helping Pichai shoot down those trumped-up claims, which are hard to prove either way thanks to the company’s black box algorithms. The rhetorical tennis match left precious little time for committee members to explore in any detail the urgent questions around Google’s interest in building a censored search engine for China, the company’s bulk data collection practices, its recent security breaches, or issues related to competition and antitrust regulation.

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Here’s how Lyft envisions self-driving cars communicating with pedestrians | TechCrunch

The question of how self-driving cars will interact and communicate with humans is one that has come up before, but the answer is still up in the air. Google has been looking into this at least since 2012, and earlier this year, Uber filed a patent for using flashing lights and sounds to talk to pedestrians. Now, the United States Patent Office has granted Lyft with a patent for what it describes as an autonomous vehicle notification system.

Lyft’s solution entails developing a predetermined message to display on the most visible car window. In one example, each window includes a projector, a see-through screen or another display device to communicate the message.

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Google to kill Google+ early after exposing personal data of more than 50 million | Mashable

Google will end the consumer version of its ill-fated social network Google+ in April, four months earlier than expected, after finding another security issue impacting more than 50 million people.

In a blog post Monday, Google said that a November software update caused the Google+ API to inadvertently make users’ personal information viewable to developers, even if they had opted to keep their details private. The bug was addressed after six days, and users’ passwords and financial data were not impacted, according to the company.

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10,400 Verizon workers quit their jobs. That’s a good sign for the economy | CNN

A lot of people want to quit their jobs at Verizon, and that’s a really good sign for the economy.

In a drive to cut costs and shift investments as it rolls out 5G service, the company announced on Monday that 10,400 management employees had accepted voluntary buyout deals, out of 44,000 who were eligible.

That might have been partially due to the fact that the terms of severance were generous, at three weeks of pay for each year of service, capped at 60 weeks.

But it’s likely there’s a larger factor at play: The unemployment rate is now 3.7%, compared to 5.8% when Verizon last offered buyouts, meaning those workers figure they have a good chance of taking the money and finding another job.

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How Building Relationships Helped Build My Business | Entrepreneur

When Anne Marie Berger started ForeFront Corp. two decades ago, it was a one-woman business and she thought she’d keep it that way. But Berger soon learned that building relationships with customers and colleagues was key to running a prospering company.

Today, ForeFront Corp.—which provides data management, integration, and mapping solutions to businesses—has more than 50 employees in Fair Haven, N.J. and Berger has worked hard to make relationship building a key tenet of her company’s culture.

Here are three lessons she’s learned while building her business from a one-woman startup to a thriving global technology consultancy.

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Are You Financially Ready to Start a Business? | Getentrepreneurial.com

Starting a business could be your next step toward financial and personal freedom. But obviously there’s a lot to think about before in dive in.

First of all, is this the lifestyle you want to pursue? Second, do you have enough money to get started? Use the financial essentials below to help you determine whether launching a business makes financial sense for your future.

Look at Your Personal Financial State

If you’re trying to open a company, you’ve probably been setting money aside. Even if they’ve been doing this, most business owners still have to take out a loan, but your savings should substantially reduce the personal financial burden.

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