Category Archives: News and Views

Makers Of Impossible Burger Are Working On Plant-Based Milk | Digital Trends

The meat-free Impossible Burger has gone from “impossible” to “frankly, pretty commonplace” within an impressively short period of time. Perhaps looking for its next big sci-fi challenge, Impossible Foods announced Tuesday that it is moving beyond plant-based meat and into another animal product in the form of plant-based milk.

“The plant-based alternatives that are out there are inadequate,” Impossible CEO Pat Brown said. “The reality is that if they weren’t, there wouldn’t be a dairy market.”

While Impossible Milk is still in the research and development phase and not yet available commercially, the company showed off samples of the new milk-inspired foodstuff (err, drinkstuff) during a demonstration from its food lab; showcasing a plant-based milk alternative that appears far more creamy and milklike than current milk substitutes such as soy milk, almond milk, coconut milk, and assorted others. It also will not curdle when it comes into contact with hot beverages, as shown by the researcher carrying out the demo by mixing it with hot coffee.

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How Safe Is Your Data While Working Remotely? | Entrepreneur

On the heels of the COVID-19 pandemic, cybersecurity has become a major source of concern for companies and individuals. With more people working remotely, cybersecurity efforts have moved out of the office, leaving individuals and companies with a need to set up better security at home.

According to a report by Centrify, a leading provider of Identity-Centric Privileged Access Management solutions, “Nearly three-quarters of business decision-makers (71%) believe that the shift to 100% remote working during the Covid-19 crisis has increased the likelihood of a cyber breach”.

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World’s first portable MRI machine comes to patients | New Atlas

A study published in the journal JAMA Neurology is reporting promising results testing the world’s first portable MRI machine in a real-world intensive care setting. The groundbreaking device effectively detected brain abnormalities in almost all patients studied, paving the way for new bedside diagnostic capabilities.

Developed by healthcare technology company Hyperfine, the point-of-care (POC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was first revealed last year. The device is claimed to be 20 times less costly, use 35 times less power, and is 10 times lighter than current MRI machines.

Traditional MRI machines are big and expensive devices, requiring custom-built rooms to contain the powerful magnetic fields used for imaging. Until recently, the prospect of a portable MRI machine was unimaginable but recent advances in computing power have enabled images to be produced using smaller magnets.

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Coronavirus: ‘Lockdown was madness but saved us financially’ | BBC News

The coronavirus pandemic has hit the global economy hard, but some people’s personal finances have never looked better.

Since the US shut down en masse in March, mum-of-three Paula, who lives in New Hampshire, has paid off some $20,000 (£15,270) in credit card debt the family had racked up in the aftermath of an unexpectedly expensive work relocation.

The 35-year-old’s job as an analyst ended in June, but her husband is still working and she benefited from a temporary $600 boost to weekly unemployment payments Congress approved in response to the crisis.

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Ola fails to get ride-hailing license renewed in London, says it will appeal and continues to operate | TechCrunch

Just six days after Uber won its appeal against London transportation regulators to continue operating in London for another 18 months, one of its bigger rivals has found itself in the hot seat. Ola, the India-based ride-hailing startup, is not getting its Transport for London ride-hailing license renewed, after failing to meet some of TfL’s public safety requirements specifically around licensing for drivers and vehicles.

Ola told TechCrunch it plans to appeal the decision, and as was the case with Uber, under TfL’s rules, a company is allowed to continue operating while appealing a decision.

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Trump says the economy is booming. He’s right — but you don’t feel it | CNN

President Donald Trump touts the economy’s quick recovery as evidence of his administration’s success. He’s not wrong, but it’s not the full picture.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell spent all last week testifying about the recovery on Capital Hill. His message: This is a tale of two economies, and one looks much stronger than the other.

On paper, the economy is roaring back even stronger than Powell and many economists expected.: More than 22 million jobs vanished in the spring lockdown, but 10.6 million jobs have since been added back.

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Divers discover lost WWII submarine wreck off Southeast Asia | Live Science

Divers in Southeast Asia have located the lost wreck of what’s thought to be a U.S. Navy submarine that sank in 1943 after it was attacked by Japanese aircraft.

The submarine wreck — almost certainly that of USS Grenadier — was found in a search of the northern end of the Straits of Malacca, between the Malay peninsula and Sumatra.

The divers cross-referenced military records of three submarines sunk in the area during World War II with the possible locations of wrecks reported by fishermen who had snagged nets on submerged obstacles, said team member Lance Horowitz, an Australian based on Thailand’s southern island of Phuket.

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U.K. Plans for Aerial Drone Zone to Contain UAV Traffic | Digital Trends

The technology needed to drive delivery drones is already in existence, but laws have yet to catch up. To help take drone technology to the next step of mainstream adoption, the U.K. is currently in the process of establishing what could be the world’s first commercial drone corridor. This airspace will be available to any fully automated drones flying beyond visual line-of-sight (BVLOS), so long as it doesn’t require specialist hardware and conforms to basic technical regulations.

The unrestricted airspace — called the “Arrow Drone Zone” — will be located in the town of Reading, to the west of London, in the Thames Valley. The Drone Zone will be approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) long and 500 meters (1,640 feet) wide. While it is referred to as a, well, zone for drones, it is technically unrestricted open airspace, meaning that drones and general aviation vehicles (read: airplanes and helicopters) will share the same space.

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Daily Crunch: This TikTok deal is pretty confusing | TechCrunch

Companies send out conflicting messages about the TikTok deal, Microsoft acquires a gaming giant and the WeChat ban is temporarily blocked. This is your Daily Crunch for September 21, 2020.

The big story: This TikTok deal is pretty confusing

This keeps getting more confusing. Apparently TikTok’s parent company ByteDance has reached a deal with Walmart and Oracle that will allow the Chinese social media app to continue operating in the United States, and the deal has been approved by Donald Trump. But it’s hard to tell exactly what this agreement entails.

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Colds Nearly Vanished Under Lockdown. Now They’re Coming Back | WIRED

THE QUESTION MAY seem odd in the midst of a global pandemic, but among people in places with serious mask-wearing and social-distancing measures, and with the luxury to hunker down, it is forgivable to wonder: Will I ever get sick again? In the southern hemisphere, in places like Australia and South Africa, winter flu season came and went without a trace. The western United States is coughing through clouds of smoke, and people everywhere have endured wet-eyed allergy seasons. But over the past 6 months, people were far less likely to get sick sick—at least from respiratory viruses that aren’t called SARS-CoV-2.

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