Author Archives: knjohn

Sony’s 4th Generation Noise Cancelling Headphones | CoolBusinessIdeas.com

The MDR-1000X started it all in 2016, followed a year later by the WH-1000XM2, and then the XM3 in August 2017. Now, the highly anticipated XM4 noise-canceling headphones have been announced.

Until we tried on a pair of the original 1000X headphones at IFA 2016, we had thought that Bose was going to rule the noise-canceling roost for a long time to come. Sony’s over-ears impressively removed the background hustle and bustle from the show floor and allowed us to completely focus on the sample music being offered.

The technology has gone from strength to strength with each successive generation, with us noting after taking the XM3s for a proper workout that “it’s the noise canceling capabilities that really sell these headphones, setting a new bar for other headphone manufacturers to strive for.”

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Oculus will stop selling its PC-connected Rift S in spring 2021 | Mashable

Pour one out for the Rift S because it’s about to go the way of the dodo.

Come springtime next year, Oculus will cease production and sales of the Rift S, its current PC-connected VR headset. The bittersweet news, announced on virtual stage at this year’s Facebook Connect conference (formerly known as Oculus Connect), marks a stark shift in strategy for the two companies, and is perfectly timed for the introduction of Oculus’ newest headset, the wireless Quest 2.

It’s an unfortunate and shockingly early end for the Rift platform which has its roots in the original DK1 developer headset that catapulted to fame during a successful 2012 Kickstarter campaign. Not long after in 2014, Facebook made a surprise $3 billion acquisition of Oculus, bringing its founders and nascent VR hardware into its fold, and promising to invest in the burgeoning industry.

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Why people are flocking to ugly produce during the pandemic | CNN

When the pandemic hit the United States in March, Imperfect Foods found itself scrambling to keep up with a sudden spike in demand.

In early 2020, the five-year-old online grocery startup was delivering about 100,000 food boxes a week. By May, that weekly figure had doubled. From June to August, weekly orders have remained at about 200,000 to 210,000 per week. On average, order sizes have doubled year over year.

The surge shouldn’t come as a surprise. Imperfect Foods, an online subscription service that sells discount “ugly” fruits and vegetables along with staples like baked goods, meat and dairy, is in many ways a business fit for the coronavirus era. Its model appeals to shoppers desperate for groceries who have turned to online offerings to avoid long lines or crowds at the supermarket.

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Does sugar make kids hyper? | Live Science

If a child eats cotton candy, a chocolate bar or any other kind of sugary treat, will a hyperactive frenzy follow? While some parents may swear that the answer is “yes,” research shows that it’s just not true.

Yes, that’s right. “Sugar does not appear to affect behavior in children,” said Dr. Mark Wolraich, chief of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, who researched sugar’s effect on children in the 1990s.

Instead, parent’s expectations of so-called “sugar highs” appear to color the way they view their children’s behavior, Wolraich said. It’s easy to see why parents make the link: Sugar is often the main attraction at birthday parties, on Halloween and other occasions when children are likely to bounce off the walls. But all that energy is due to kids being excited, not from the sugar in their systems, he said. [Is Sugar Bad for You?]

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Intellectual Property Rights in the Workplace | Business News Daily

In many cases, intellectual property (IP) created on behalf of a business in exchange for compensation is considered the property of the business that commissioned it.

The terms of a signed business agreement might stipulate who owns any intellectual property created on company time or using company equipment. Review all agreements carefully before signing.

Though intellectual property laws favor businesses, employees have rights. Consult with an attorney if you believe a business agreement you’ve signed violates state or federal law.

This article is for professionals and creatives who regularly develop intellectual property on behalf of businesses and need to know who owns the rights to their work.

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Why You’re Not Interested in Anything And Have No Motivation | Life Hack

Let’s clarify something before we move forward: This article is in no way meant to cure, treat, or diagnose depression. Actually, this article isn’t even about depression. Depression is the result of a combination of unique events and genetic, psychological, and environmental predispositions. When you’re depressed, you lose all hope for the future, always have no energy, consistently feel sad without knowing why, and are not interested in anything. If you feel like you might be suffering from this illness, you need to seek psychiatric help as soon as possible.

Nevertheless, what we’re talking about here focuses on something similar to yet entirely different from depression: lack of motivation or interest.

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On launching new subscription model for recyclable shoes | Fast Company

The Swiss running brand On will become the latest athletic company to meet the challenges of sustainable footwear—but with a notable difference: The Cyclon, its new, fully recyclable shoes, made primarily from castor beans, will be available solely via a monthly subscription. For the three Swiss founders of On, creating recycled, bio-based shoes is only a small slice of the company’s long-term sustainability vision. They also want to achieve full circularity, so that discarded clothing items are reused in their entirety to create new ones. But, as other brands have explored this vision, they’ve hit roadblocks. Adidas publicly shared that its Futurecraft.Loop pilot struggled because consumers wouldn’t send the shoes back in time for Adidas to generate the next batch and keep the circle in motion.

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‘No One Knows What’s Going On’: Unease Lingers Over TikTokers After Oracle Claims Victory In Acquisition Race

The past few weeks have been one of the more stressful periods in 16-year-old Parker Pannell’s life. His comedy vlogs had amassed sizable fanbase on TikTok, some 2.2 million followers, and he was earning thousands of dollars from creating sponsored content for businesses like Cash App and House Party. Much of that work evaporated over the last month. “Super discouraging,” says Pannell. “But who wants to put money into a brand that could potentially be on the decline?” Companies were shying away from advertising on TikTok as the Chinese-owned app raced to appease President Trump’s demand for it to sell itself or face a ban in America.

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Ready to Get Back to Business? Now Is the Perfect Time to Up Your E-Commerce Game | AllBusiness.com

As many years as I’ve been out of school, September still feels like a time of renewal. An opportunity to start anew, to reinvent some aspect of your life or your business, to refocus on tasks that got forgotten in the heat and lazy days of summer.

This year has been tough for most of the country, with so many of us trying to live and work under safer-at-home policies. It’s been a rough year for retailers, in particular, with so many stores closed for months due to the coronavirus. In fact, eMarketer has adjusted its 2020 retail sales forecast from its original projection of a 2.8% sales increase to $5.6 trillion in total retail sales to a 10.5% sales decline to $4.9 trillion in sales.

But there is a brighter side to that forecast, and it’s e-commerce. Online sales are, according to eMarketer, expected to rise 18% this year to $710 billion. This represents 14.5% of total retail sales, which eMarketer says is “both an all-time high and the biggest share increase in a single year.”

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39 PPP Fraud Prosecutions So Far, and Counting | Small Business Trends

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans have aided more than 5 million small business owners, providing a much-needed lifeline during the Coronavirus outbreak crisis. The overwhelming majority of business owners are legitimate and will use the money as intended to retain employees and stay operational.

But the PPP program has attracted a few rotten apples. And you won’t believe how rotten they are.

To date, the Justice Department has filed 39 PPP fraud cases, charging about 56 defendants. Defendants are charged with bilking taxpayers out of tens of millions of dollars. Luckily, the Feds have recovered a large part of the loan proceeds already.

And what’s been recovered tells a wild tale.

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