Tag Archives: Apple

Apple and Google block UK COVID app update for breaking data-sharing rules | Mashable

Google and Apple have blocked an update to the UK government’s COVID-19 contact tracing app for breaching privacy terms, the BBC reports.

The update, which was expected to roll out in time with the lifting of national lockdown on Monday, would have requested users who tested positive for COVID-19 to upload their history of venue check-ins. The app, used in England and Wales, has long operated with a feature that allows users to check in to a shop, pub, restaurant, or other venue using a QR code — some are required by law to display official NHS QR code posters and collect contact details, while others are encouraged.

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10 Things You Didn’t Know Your iPad Could Do | Digital Trends

The iPad is becoming an increasingly versatile tablet. Between the branching out of iPadOS from iOS and the fact that Apple has been leaning into the iPad as a kind of laptop replacement, the iPad has a lot to it. In fact, I’ve actually been using the iPad Pro as a replacement for a laptop for over a year now, and while I still have a Mac Mini that I use for the bulk of my work, I’ve learned a lot about iPadOS and how to get the most out of it.

Interested in getting more out of your iPad? Here are 10 things that you probably didn’t know your iPad could do.

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Apple will finally fix the iOS issue that blocked searches for ‘Asian’ as adult content | Mashable

Do you have adult content blocked on your iPhone or iPad?

If so, it’s likely that your iOS device is currently blocking web searches using the word “Asian.” It’s been an issue for more than a year — but it’s about to be fixed.

Mashable has confirmed that in the latest iOS 14.5 Beta, the adult content filter no longer blocks web searches containing the word “Asian.”

The iOS 14.5 Beta was released for developers just last week. Apple will launch the public release for all users sometime in the Spring.

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This Week in Apps: Google Play slashes commissions, Apple sued over scammy apps, YouTube launches a TikTok clone in the US | TechCrunch

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the weekly TechCrunch series that recaps the latest in mobile OS news, mobile applications and the overall app economy.

The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 218 billion downloads and $143 billion in global consumer spend in 2020.

Consumers last year also spent 3.5 trillion minutes using apps on Android devices alone. And in the U.S., app usage surged ahead of the time spent watching live TV. Currently, the average American watches 3.7 hours of live TV per day, but now spends four hours per day on their mobile devices.

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Wikipedia wants to charge Google, Amazon, and Apple for using its content | Mashable

Everybody uses Wikipedia.

It’s currently the 8th most visited website in the U.S. and the 13th most trafficked site in the world. The website bills itself as the “free encyclopedia,” providing knowledge free of charge to a global user base. However, the nonprofit which runs Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, hopes that it soon won’t be free for everybody.

Don’t worry, it’ll still likely be free for you, dear Mashable reader. But for companies like Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon, Wikipedia is hoping to charge them for publishing its content.

A new report by Wired looks into a brand new division under the Wikimedia umbrella called Wikimedia Enterprise. In a first for the nonprofit Wikimedia Foundation, Wikimedia Enterprise will offer a paid service targeting Wikipedia’s biggest users: Big Tech companies.

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The iMac Pro is being discontinued | TechCrunch

Chalk this up to inevitability. The iMac Pro is soon to be no more. First noted by 9to5Mac, TechCrunch has since confirmed with Apple that the company will stop selling the all-in-one once the current stock is depleted.

One configuration of the desktop is still available through Apple’s site, listed as “While Supplies Last” and priced at $5,000. Some other versions can also still be found from third-party retailers, as well, if you’re so inclined.

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Apple Wants To Roll Out VR Experience For Businesses | Getentrepreneurial.com

Apple may leap into the VR headset space with a “mostly virtual reality device” as early as next year, per Bloomberg. The news comes amid a period of renewed interest in VR from companies tinkering with the tech for remote work applications. When released, the headset—which will be similar in size to the Oculus Quest—could reportedly feature a 3D environment for gaming, video, and communication, along with some limited AR functionality, an internal fan, support for prescription lenses, and a hefty price tag typical of Apple gadgets.

Apple’s VR push marks its first major hardware endeavor since the 2015 release of the Apple Watch, breaking from its recent focus on services. For years, Apple’s soaring profits were tied to its crowning jewel—the iPhone. While iPhones still made up a majority (54.7%) of Apple’s sales in 2019, that figure has steadily decreased over time. In Apple’s fiscal Q4 2020 (ended September 26, 2020), for example, iPhone’s sales brought in $26.44 billion, which was down from $33.36 billion a year prior. With fewer people purchasing iPhones and other hardware, Apple made a strategic decision to pivot heavily toward its Services segment, starting first with its 2015 rollout of Apple Music and followed by TV+ and News+ subscriptions in 2019, all of which complement its already established Apple Pay and iCloud services. By the end of 2019, Services reportedly made up around 17.7% of Apple’s revenues. That continued last year as Apple announced Q4 revenues of $64 billion, propelled mainly by “all-time records” for Services, according to CEO Tim Cook.

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Apple to pay $113 million in ‘batterygate’ settlement | CNN

Apple has agreed to pay millions of dollars to 34 states over its controversial previous practice of deliberately slowing down older iPhones to extend their battery life.

The company will pay $113 million to settle an investigation by states including California and Arizona over how Apple wasn’t transparent about its iPhone battery problems that led to unexpected device shutdowns. Instead of disclosing the issue to consumers or replacing the batteries, it pushed a software update in December 2016 that impacted the performance of older iPhone models.

News of the practice upset Apple (AAPL) consumers, igniting what some called “batterygate.” Many believed it was an effort to encourage users to buy new iPhones.

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The iFixit iPhone 12 Pro teardown is finally here | Mashable

If you’re interested in the iPhone 12 Pro’s innards, you may want to block five minutes out of your day to watch iFixit’s new teardown video.

The smartphone repairability experts over at iFixit published an iPhone 12 Pro teardown that offers a detailed look at how the new Apple device is held together on the inside. Among other things, it confirms something we already knew: The battery is a downgrade from the iPhone 11 and isn’t any better than the one in the regular iPhone 12.

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How new smart speakers from Apple, Amazon, Google stack up | Mashable

The HomePod mini, announced Tuesday at Apple’s tech event, is the newest smart speaker out there. It joins refreshed models from the competition, Amazon and Google; the speakers all feature shiny new homes and let you play music, ask questions, and control your smart home and other devices. Like those from Amazon and Google, Apple’s latest device costs around $100.

So, what’s different about the three new speakers? Here’s the latest on which you should use for all your Siri, Alexa, and Google Assistant needs.

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