Tag Archives: TikTok

TikTok’s eel pit guy has found fame on the app | Mashable

Nick Tobler is a 25-year-old aquarium store manager in Kentucky, but you might know him better as TikTok’s eel pit guy.

More than 380,000 people follow his TikTok account @cowturtle and have kept up with Tobler’s absolutely wild adventure of turning a creepy, unused rainwater cistern under his garage into an even creepier 5,000-gallon pond fit for a dozen eels.

This week, he finally filled the pond with 12 American eels, and we all watched with a mixture of curiosity, excitement, and, frankly, fear. Fans pitched names for the eels — like Bathtub, Crunchwrap Supreme, Eelon Musk, Steely Dan, Mentally Eel, Eelissa, and Neel. A crayfish named Mayonnaise is also inside the spooky pit.

Naturally, we had questions. Tobler got on the phone with Mashable to answer everything from “are your eels in your will” to “why haven’t you introduced them to a dog?”

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Why You Need TikTok in Your Small Business | Small Business Trends

When people ask where they can find me on social media, I say, everywhere except TikTok”. But now I realize that so many small business owners are using videos on TikTok (and you don’t need to know how to dance!) in their marketing strategy.

The growth of Tik Tok statistics as a social media platform are nothing short of amazing. According to Sprout Social:

  • TikTok has over 1 billion monthly active users. (This is similar to Instagram and Twitter only has 330 million per month.)

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When Native American spirituality shows up on social media, ask who’s profiting | Mashable

While scrolling through Instagram, TikTok or Facebook, you may notice people who call themselves guides, healers, or coaches and boast that they can provide you with instant enlightenment and spiritual guidance to enhance your “vibration.” The end result? A path to a better you.

To be honest, I’m not criticizing anyone who seeks comfort by connecting to self-professed healers making these claims. As a matter of fact, I think the majority of individuals who pursue an understanding of spirituality outside of our normal reality are well intentioned. Perhaps they’re even seeking refuge from the violent legacy of organized religions, including Christianity. As an Osage man, as well as a Native educator, I am very familiar with how the church has villainized Native spirituality, traditions, and ceremonies.

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TikTok tests Snapchat style vanishing video stories feature | BBC News

Video-sharing platform TikTok is trialling a new vanishing clips feature similar to functions on Snapchat, Facebook and Instagram.

TikTok Stories will allow users to see content posted by accounts they follow for 24 hours before they are deleted.

It comes as WhatsApp rolls out a feature for users to post photos or videos that vanish after they are seen.

This week rival social media platform Twitter shut down its Fleets disappearing stories feature.

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This Week in Apps: Google Play slashes commissions, Apple sued over scammy apps, YouTube launches a TikTok clone in the US | TechCrunch

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the weekly TechCrunch series that recaps the latest in mobile OS news, mobile applications and the overall app economy.

The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 218 billion downloads and $143 billion in global consumer spend in 2020.

Consumers last year also spent 3.5 trillion minutes using apps on Android devices alone. And in the U.S., app usage surged ahead of the time spent watching live TV. Currently, the average American watches 3.7 hours of live TV per day, but now spends four hours per day on their mobile devices.

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PearPop lets TikTok celebrities monetize by sharing shout-outs and screen time with fans | TechCrunch

PearPop a new Los Angeles-based company, is on its way to racking up nearly 25,000 users in less than a month, and has already landed seed funding from the firm Rocket One Capital.

The company’s premise is simple. Allow fans to bid for shared screen time with their favorite TikTok celebrities, and it’s one that has attracted the attention of a few of the platform’s stars with several million followers.

The company was able to hook 3,000 users with one post from Anna Shumate, a TikTok star with 6.5 million followers who goes by the handle of “annabananaxdddd,” according to the company’s founder, Cole Mason.

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‘No One Knows What’s Going On’: Unease Lingers Over TikTokers After Oracle Claims Victory In Acquisition Race

The past few weeks have been one of the more stressful periods in 16-year-old Parker Pannell’s life. His comedy vlogs had amassed sizable fanbase on TikTok, some 2.2 million followers, and he was earning thousands of dollars from creating sponsored content for businesses like Cash App and House Party. Much of that work evaporated over the last month. “Super discouraging,” says Pannell. “But who wants to put money into a brand that could potentially be on the decline?” Companies were shying away from advertising on TikTok as the Chinese-owned app raced to appease President Trump’s demand for it to sell itself or face a ban in America.

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It’s almost impossible to avoid triggering content on TikTok | Mashable

TikTok’s algorithm is almost too good at suggesting relatable content — to the point of being detrimental for some users’ mental health.

It’s nearly impossible to avoid triggering content on TikTok, and because of the nature of the app’s never-ending For You Page, users can easily end up trapped scrolling through suggested content curated for their specific triggers.

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How a TikTok ban could work, and what it means for your content | Mashable

President Donald Trump casually dropped Friday that he would “ban” TikTok. That added heft to earlier statements made by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo that the administration was considering a ban.

But how would a ban on an app that’s already been downloaded by 165 million Americans, and that anyone can currently download from Apple and Google app stores, actually work?

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Startups Weekly: The world is eating tech | TechCrunch

You could almost hear the internet cracking apart this week as international businesses pulled away from Hong Kong and the US considered a ban on TikTok. Software can no longer eat the entire world like it had attempted last decade. Startups across tech-focused industries face a new reality, where local markets and efforts are more protected and supported by national governments. Every company now has a smaller total addressable market, whether or not it succeeds in it.

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