Category Archives: Case Studies

Yumi Co-founders Angela Sutherland and Evelyn Rusli On Why You Can Doubt Your Choices But Not Yourself | Entrepreneur

Like so many entrepreneurs, Angela Sutherland didn’t know that she wanted to start a business until a problem was staring her in the face. Sutherland was working in private equity when she got pregnant with her first child. She soon found herself looking for information about the best baby food options — but kept running into conflicting information about the healthiest brands and seeing products that were high in sugar.

After reading about how vital nutrition is during the first 1,000 days of life, Sutherland, who had been looking for a career change, took on the challenge to make it easier for other parents to provide healthy food to their babies. With her friend Evelyn Rusli, the two cofounders launched Yumi, an early childhood meal delivery service.

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3 Weird Analytic Practices at Mode | Tayler Mehit

tayler_3practices@mode_article

For many of Mode’s employees, this is their first job at an analytics company. Those team members often assume that Mode’s internal analytics processes mirror the way analysis is commonly conducted within other organizations. In some ways, that assumption holds true. As CEO Derek Steer puts it, “I wish I had a more mind-blowing story for how we do internal reporting… But mostly, it’s funnel analysis.” That said, we approach analysis from some uncommon angles.

Frequently, we begin an analysis with a one-off report, rather than setting out to build a big dashboard. Many of our most technically proficient internal users, who produce some of our best analysis, are on the Customer Success team. And reports that are built with one purpose often find extended lifespans as reusable tools. In this post, we’ll take a look at some of the uncommon analytics practices internally at Mode.

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After being laid off, this 35-year-old founded NerdWallet with $800 — now it’s worth $500 million | CNBC

Today, Tim Chen is CEO and co-founder of personal finance website NerdWallet, which sees 10 million monthly visitors and is valued at more than $500 million.

But in 2008, like so many others during the financial crisis, Chen found himself unemployed.

After spending four years working at hedge funds like Perry Capital and JAT Capital Management, he found out “basically on Christmas Day,” that he was being laid off, Chen tells CNBC Make It.

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High-Paying Trade Jobs Sit Empty, While High School Grads Line Up For University | NPR

Like most other American high school students, Garret Morgan had it drummed into him constantly: Go to college. Get a bachelor’s degree.

“All through my life it was, ‘if you don’t go to college you’re going to end up on the streets,’ ” Morgan said. “Everybody’s so gung-ho about going to college.”

So he tried it for a while. Then he quit and started training as an ironworker, which is what he is doing on a weekday morning in a nondescript high-ceilinged building with a concrete floor in an industrial park near the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

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Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders | Scientific American

Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders

Those with an IQ above 120 are perceived as less effective, regardless of actual performance.

Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders

Intelligence makes for better leaders—from undergraduates to executives to presidents—according to multiple studies. It certainly makes sense that handling a market shift or legislative logjam requires cognitive oomph. But new research on leadership suggests that, at a certain point, having a higher IQ stops helping and starts hurting.

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Conquering Adversity: From Homeless Teen to C-Suite | Business News Daily

You could say I had an unconventional upbringing – but it served me well and was the catalyst for my sense of determination, level of conviction and desire to succeed. I am truly a product of my own making.

My parents divorced when I was 12 years old. My mother moved far from our home in Michigan and I spent my early teen years living with my father. But, at the young age of 16, I moved to Florida to live with my mother. My presence was not well-received by my step-father. Before I could even graduate high school, I found myself homeless, broke and completely on my own.

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How This Bedsheets Startup Figured Out The Right Way To Disrupt Sleep Patterns | Fast Company

There was a time not that long ago when buying high-quality bedsheets was a major investment. Walk into Nordstrom or Barneys, and you could easily drop $750 or more on sheets from Frette, Sferra, or Loro Piana. But over the last three years, a transformation has begun to democratize the process. Brands like Brooklinen, Parachute, and Boll & Branch are using clever direct-to-consumer business models that bring high-threadcount, long-staple cotton sheets to consumers at prices that start at under $100.

This new flock of bedsheets startups has been growing fast—expanding their product ranges and generating millions of dollars in revenue—and none has seen more impressive stats than Brooklyn-based Brooklinen. On the eve of its third anniversary, the company is only just now taking on its first external funding, a $10 million Series A round led by FirstMark Capital. The brand first came to the market in April 2014 with a Kickstarter campaign that raised $237,000, but after that point, its wife-and-husband cofounders say they were committed to bootstrapping the company.

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How Rachael Ray Grew Her Brand Way Beyond the Kitchen | Entrepreneur

Even if you’re not a foodie or a fan of talk shows, chances are you’ve heard of Rachael Ray. The everyday cook started promoting her 30-minute meal idea locally at a store in upstate New York. Someone from the Today show happened to stumble upon her work, and as the story goes, a few guest segments on the morning show later, she was offered her own show.

Though adamant she’s not a chef, she’s clearly an expert, and coming up with over 5,000 recipes gave Ray unique insights into tools and products that were missing. This lead to the invention of multiple products, such as the Moppine and the oval Pasta Pot. She now has over 365 SKUs of cookware on the market in partnership with the Meyer Corporation.

Most impressive, though, is how far she has extended her reach outside the kitchen.

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Detroit-Made Bicycles Are Taking Over Bike-Share Programs | Bloomberg

The Detroit Bikes factory sits on the West Side of the city near scattered abandoned homes and a junkyard full of rusted car parts. Inside, workers are taking test rides through the 50,000-square-foot facility on a fleet of freshly assembled bicycles destined for New York’s Citi Bike bike-share program. On foot, founder Zak Pashak, 36, dodges the riders, navigating a path around the chaotic floor and holding forth on the virtues of American-made chromoly steel—which, in case you’re not a metallurgist, is lighter and stronger than standard steel and is what Pashak uses in his house line. He stops and points to the loading dock, where a tractor-trailer waits to haul the bikes more than 600 miles to Citi Bike headquarters in Brooklyn. “This was my dream when we got the factory—watching semis drive away at the end of the day,” Pashak says.

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A Dyslexic Entrepreneur Says His Disability Helped Him Build A $3.6M Company | Forbes

Stan Gloss, 60, is cofounder and CEO of BioTeam, a consulting firm that designs computer systems and networks for the life sciences market. The 14-year-old company has both public and private sector clients, including the National Institutes of Health , the Centers for Disease Control, Biogen and Regeneron. While Gloss is based in Middleton, MA, his 18 employees all work from their homes in eight cities across the country, including New York, Pittsburgh, Austin and Gainesville, FLA. Last year BioTeam logged $3.6 million in revenue. Gloss has fought a lifelong battle with dyslexia, managing to become a college professor and cycle through four other jobs before starting BioTeam. In this condensed and edited interview, he describes how he learned to make the most of his disability and why he thinks dyslexics can become successful entrepreneurs.

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