Tag Archives: Whole Foods

Prime members can now get Whole Foods delivered with free Amazon Fresh | Mashable

Amazon really, really wants Prime Members to use its Amazon Fresh delivery service. So it’s getting rid of the steep $14.99/month fee for Prime members, and it’s adding groceries from your local Whole Foods.

Amazon Fresh is Amazon’s answer to grocery services like Instacart, offering home delivery or pickup for folks who, understandably, don’t want to wait 30 minutes at one of two open checkout lanes in a physical supermarket.

Besides getting rid of that monthly fee, Amazon also announced an expansion of Amazon Fresh delivery, making it available in “more than 2,000 cities and towns” with more to come. These locales are all based around nearly two dozen major metropolitan areas, including New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago.

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Amazon Buying Whole Foods: An Industry Shudders | Fortune.com

For years, Amazon has been the specter looming over retail, as once-dominant department stores and specialty chains fell on harder and harder times. But up until now, the e-commerce titan has managed to irrevocably alter the industry without making much of a dent in retail’s biggest moneymaker of all—the $800 billion grocery business.

That changed on June 16 when Amazon announced its intention to acquire Whole Foods, the upscale supermarket chain that played a pivotal role in taking organic and natural foods mainstream. Whole Foods itself may have been under duress, pressured by an activist investor and softening sales, but the healthy-food movement and the meticulously curated store experience that it pioneered is alive and well. “Amazon is placing its bet on the future of the food industry,” says Errol Schweizer, a former Whole Foods executive who is now an industry adviser, “and they see Whole Foods as the leadership.”

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Amazon is gobbling Whole Foods for a reported $13.7 billion | TechCrunch

Amazon has made a bid to buy Whole Foods in what would be a whopping $13.7 billion deal.

The all-cash acquisition (which includes Whole Foods Market’s net debt), will radically shake up any number of businesses and completely changes the online retail and bricks and mortar landscape.

“Millions of people love Whole Foods Market because they offer the best natural and organic foods, and they make it fun to eat healthy,” said Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder and chief executive in a statement. “Whole Foods Market has been satisfying, delighting and nourishing customers for nearly four decades – they’re doing an amazing job and we want that to continue.

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Is Kroger going to buy Whole Foods? | Money CNN

Will $6 bottles of asparagus water soon be coming to a Kroger, Ralphs or Harris Teeter near you? Whole Foods stock shot up 5% Thursday and briefly rose again Friday on chatter that supermarket king Kroger may want to buy the troubled organic grocer.

But is Whole Foods (WFM) really for sale? Investors may need to take these rumors with several grains of Himalayan pink sea salt.

For one, Whole Foods is still facing many challenges, mostly stemming from bad press about its high prices. The company settled charges of price gouging with regulators in New York City last year, but the company’s Whole Paycheck image persists.

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Are you prepared to drink pea milk?| Mashable

Remember when everyone drank milk from cows? Now, the only people who drink animal protein are, like, your parents.

Today people aren’t drinking as much cow’s milk, whether it’s because they have difficulty digesting lactose, they want a healthier alternatives with less fat or, perhaps, a product not associated with a beating heart. As the U.S. market continues to shift towards alternative milks — almond, hemp, coconut, soy and rice — and our meals transition to healthier plant-based diets, the tradeoff is that we risk losing key sources daily protein.

Beginning May 2, every Whole Foods from here to Omaha will stock a new morning drink called Ripple, made from protein pulled from plants. And (phew) it doesn’t taste like grass.

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Whole Foods Is Losing Its ‘Whole Paycheck’ Reputation | time.com/money

Whole Foods is winning over customers based on the pitch that high food standards don’t necessarily have to come with high price tags.

In Whole Foods’ fourth-quarter results released on Wednesday, investors found out that total sales increased 9% year over year, while comparable-store sales inched up 3.1%—”in line with its expectations, but marking its worst growth rate in over four years,” the Wall Street Journal noted.

Nonetheless, investors were plenty pleased with the direction the company is going, sending Whole Foods shares up more than 10% early Thursday.

Investments aside, what’s most interesting for everyday shoppers about the results—and about Whole Foods’ plans going forward—is that the supermarket often dubbed “Whole Paycheck” for its high-end and high-priced selection is experiencing success in a broad initiative to lower prices.

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