Tag Archives: us economy

Who Wants the Global Talent | Management Consulting Connection

For all of its faults, the United States has been the destination of choice for emigrants since – well – for half a century. Personally, I have friends and family who got their green cards just within the last few years. The US continues to be a magnet for talented and ambitious risk takers. Bill Kerr, Harvard Professor, titled his most recent book, The Gift of Global Talent: How Immigration Shapes Business, Economics, and Society and his thesis is simple – even if the data collection was difficult – immigrants drive a large % of growth, innovation, and entrepreneurship. People want to live and work here, and that’s largely been a big blessing. Factoid: 40% of US cancer researchers are immigrants.

US economy = huge demand

Times are good (yes, looking at the stock market this week, you might not think so), and unemployment in the US is at a 50 year low. As of October 2018, there were 7M unfilled jobs in the United States.  This includes 450,000 highly-skilled manufacturing jobs. It’s a fairly basic tenet of economics that suppliers will try to fulfill demand. Here’s a data point, H1B visa season starts April 1. There are 85K visa to allocate, and typically there are 300K applications after one week.

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Untapped Potential for Expanding Women’s Entrepreneurship Holds Promise to Grow the U.S. Economy, According to Kauffman Report

Women who are capable of starting growth companies that serve global markets may be the nation’s secret weapon for achieving sustained economic growth.

Research shows that startup companies – particularly high-growth startups – are the most fruitful source of new U.S. jobs and offer the economy’s best hope for recovery. However, despite the fact that about 46 percent of the workforce and more than 50 percent of college students are female, and that women have risen to top positions in corporate and university hierarchies, they represent only about 35 percent of startup business owners. Their firms also tend to experience less growth and prosperity than do firms started by men.

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