Tag Archives: careers

Study Says Millennials Embrace Job-Hopping | Business News Daily

For many years, having a career meant finding an employer and sticking with it until retirement. However, according to a new survey, millennials are likely to change jobs frequently, and they see that as a necessary step for career advancement.

The 2019 Millennial Manager Workplace Survey, released earlier today by Akumina, reports that 75% of millennials believe that constantly changing jobs advanced their careers. The survey’s data is based on information provided by more than 1,000 mid- to executive-level managers between the ages of 18 and 36 years old. The company conducted the survey to “gain insights into the realities of millennial managers’ career journeys, workplace needs and technology preferences.”

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Women in America | The White House

“This collection of data from across the Federal government offers the most comprehensive look at women in America since the 1960s,” Acting Deputy Secretary of Commerce Rebecca Blank said. “With this report, the administration can more effectively manage programs that support women and girls and America’s families, and foster the growth of the U.S. economy.”

Each page of this report is full of the most up-to-date facts on the status of women. Of particular note
are the following:

  • As the report shows, women have made enormous progress on some fronts. Women have not only caught up with men in college attendance but younger women are now more likely than younger men to have a college or a master’s degree. Women are also working more and the number of women and men in the labor force has nearly equalized in recent years. As women’s work has increased, their earnings constitute a growing share of family income.
  • Yet, these gains in education and labor force involvement have not yet translated into wage and income equity. At all levels of education, women earned about 75 percent of what their male counterparts earned in 2009. In part because of these lower earnings and in part because unmarried and divorced women are the most likely to have responsibility for raising and supporting their children, women are more likely to be in poverty than men. These economic inequities are even more acute for women of color.
  • Women live longer than men but are more likely to face certain health problems, such as mobility impairments, arthritis, asthma, depression, and obesity. Women also engage in lower levels of physical activity. Women are less likely than men to suffer from heart disease or diabetes. Many women do not receive specific recommended preventative care, and one out of seven women age 18-64 has no usual source of health care. The share of women in that age range without health insurance has also increased.
  • Women are less likely than in the past to be the target of violent crimes, including homicide. But women are victims of certain crimes, such as intimate partner violence and stalking, at higher rates than men.

Read Report.