Tag Archives: twitter

How to Manage (and Monitor) Your Reputation on Social Media | Entrepreneur

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube; it’s tough to do business these days without having at least a fledgling presence on these and other social media sites. Although the purest definition of social media is “a technology platform that connects people,” it can also be a valuable advertising platform that gives a company a way to directly engage its fans on a wide scale.

Social media from a marketing and PR perspective should be used to hold a conversation with the public, and brands should be leveraging their experts to engage, pursue and control that conversation. This is how the most successful brands engage, listen and interact with their customers across a variety of platforms. The unsuccessful ones forget this, which makes them appear stale or distant at times — and sometimes even the source of anger as “greedy corporate giants,” because mismanaged social media is the perfect recipe for a bad reputation

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How to Clean Up Your Old Posts on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram | WIRED

AS SOCIAL MEDIA platforms have evolved, they’ve become more and more about the moment—what you’re doing now, rather than what you were doing five years ago. While looking back through photos and posts can be heart-warming and provide a buzz of nostalgia, it can also be painful and embarrassing.

If your social media life spans more than a few years then you might not want friends, family, or prospective employers looking back on the sort of person that you used to be. Here we’ll show you how you can scrub your timelines on the three biggest social platforms, using both built-in tools and third-party add-ons.

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How To Delete Your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and TikTok | WIRED

SOCIAL NETWORKS WALK a fine line between being a useful tool and a crippling addiction. They’re also fraught with critics, who say that they damage our personal privacy, and can convey misinformation. Whether you want your free time back or don’t like your personal info scattered about on the internet, you may be considering deactivating some accounts.

Wanting to delete your account is one thing, but actually being able to hit the delete button is another story. Social media outlets make money off of you and your information, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that they don’t want to let you go. Because of this, the biggest networks have made it overly complicated to delete your account. But if you are set on getting rid of them, here’s what you’ll have to do.

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Facebook and Twitter clash over fact-checking as Trump threats intensify | CNN

For years, Twitter (TWTR) and Facebook (FB) have enjoyed a healthy rivalry: They’ve competed for acquisitions, talent and advertising dollars, and sometimes gone so far as to copy each others’ features in the never-ending pursuit to grow their audiences.

But the clash between the two tech companies appeared to take on new life this week after Twitter’s decision to place fact-check labels on some of President Donald Trump’s tweets sparked a series of threats, including an imminent executive order regulating social media companies.

The CEOs of the two companies traded criticisms in public. Former employees posted their own jabs on social media. And some legislators were quick to highlight the differences between the approach Twitter and Facebook took, potentially only adding to the tensions.

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Iowa Misinformation Spreads Online, Despite New Policies | WIRED

Since 2016, social media sites including Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube have vowed to crack down on misinformation related to elections. Monday, they faced their first big test, when delayed results from the Iowa Democratic caucus gave rise to partisan infighting, rampant misinformation, and conspiracy theories. Unsurprisingly, things didn’t exactly go according to plan. Twitter struggled to contain viral electoral misinformation and unfounded accusations of vote rigging from Trump allies, while Facebook grappled with disinformation.

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Daily Crunch: Twitter will delete dormant accounts | TechCrunch

1. Twitter will free up handles by deleting inactive accounts

“As part of our commitment to serve the public conversation, we’re working to clean up inactive accounts to present more accurate, credible information people can trust across Twitter,” the company said. Sounds like a smart move, with one big catch: If someone with a Twitter account died more than six months prior and no one else has their login, their account will be deleted. So hopefully, Twitter will come up with a way to memorialize these accounts.

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Twitter’s about to introduce Topics. Here’s how the new feature works | Mashable

Now that we’re all used to seeing tweets from randos we don’t follow in our feeds, Twitter is introducing a new way for you to discover just how many bad opinions are really out there regarding the things you care most about.

Meet Topics.

Essentially, Topics will expand the reach of Twitter functions like following, muting, and adding to Lists beyond individual accounts to include tweets focused on a specific thing. Whether you’re into Mars news, Carly Rae Jepsen, or Liverpool FC, you’ll be able to follow those interests as you would an account, being served the “top tweets” from “experts, fans or [accounts that] just tend to talk about that thing a lot”, according to the Twitter blog.

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Daily Crunch: Twitter is banning political ads | TechCrunch

1. Jack Dorsey says Twitter will ban all political ads

Arguing that “internet political ads present entirely new challenges to civic discourse,” CEO Jack Dorsey announced that Twitter will be banning all political advertising — albeit with “a few exceptions” like voter registration. Not only is this a decisive move by Twitter, but it also could increase pressure on Facebook to follow suit, or at least take steps in this direction.

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Twitter blocks state-run media ads after Hong Kong discord | Fast Company

Leadership at Twitter stated today that they want to “protect healthy discourse and open conversation.” To that end, they are no longer accepting advertising from state-controlled news media entities. This comes on the heels their discovery of 936 accounts inside China that were “deliberately and specifically attempting to sow political discord in Hong Kong, including undermining the legitimacy and political positions of the protest movement on the ground.”

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