Tag Archives: New Year’s Resolution

2020: Forget the Resolutions Build Your Confidence Instead | Management Consulting Connection

January is traditionally a time of looking forward and looking back. A time to consider the challenges – and failures – of the year before. To set resolutions and plan for a better year ahead. Full of good intentions, these resolutions are usually broken by the end of the month.I have never been a fan of the new year’s resolution. They seem a tad arbitrary – with a fixed deadline 12 months away, made on a whim after too much indulgence over the December weeks. Resolution means ‘a firm decision to do or not to do something’. And that is the issue – they are too firm.

The problem with resolutions is they don’t give you the chance to change things when a change in circumstances happen; meaning you are more than likely going to fail. As a result, you feel like a failure. For example: you may have decided 2020 was the year to get fit, to run 10K, to be your best self. But then a health problem arises, or a family care issue – and you no longer have the ability or time to dedicate to your resolution. It feels like a failure.

Read More

The 1 New Year’s Resolution You Should Immediately Break, According to 3 Nobel Prize-Winning Scientists | Inc.com

A common New Year’s resolution is to “get up earlier.” The resolution is treated as a positive change in lifestyle, similar to “eat more healthy” and “get more exercise.” There is a huge difference, though. Eating healthier and exercising more frequently improve your health. Rising earlier than you’re already rising, by contrast, raises your risk of heart disease and early death.

The 2017 Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to three scientists who discovered the molecular mechanism inside the brain that determines one’s natural sleep schedule. This mechanism expresses itself according to your genetics. As a result, humans (like all animals that sleep) have a circadian rhythm that determines when your brain wants to sleep.

About 10 percent of humans (early birds) have a circadian rhythm that makes them want to rise before dawn; about 20 percent of humans (night owls) have a circadian rhythm that makes them want to wake long after sunrise. It has nothing to do with willpower or moral superiority; your genes tell you when you want to sleep.

Read More